Which Diagnoses Qualify for Wheelchairs: Manual or Power

Many different diagnoses can qualify for a wheelchair. Which one you receive will depend on your situation and needs. This blog post will discuss which diagnoses qualify for wheelchairs and what type of chair you should get. We will also answer some of the most commonly asked questions about getting a wheelchair prescription from your doctor.

What diagnosis qualifies for a wheelchair?

The answer may surprise you. Many diagnoses can qualify a person for a wheelchair, including but not limited to Arthritis, Obesity, COPD, Scoliosis, MS, Fibromyalgia, Cerebral Palsy, Parkinson’s disease, and more.

While a doctor’s prescription is not required to get a wheelchair, many insurance companies will require a diagnosis to provide coverage.

So, if you are struggling with mobility, don’t hesitate to look into getting a wheelchair. It could significantly improve your quality of life. 

Some qualifying diagnoses for a wheelchair

This includes conditions like:

  • Arthritis
  • Obesity
  • COPD
  • Stroke related paralysis
  • Scoliosis
  • Spina Bifida
  • Multiple Sclerosis
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Cerebral palsy
  • Traumatic brain injury
  • Spinal cord injuries
  • Parkinson’s disease
  • CIPD
  • And more

Who should use a manual wheelchair?

For anyone that has been looking to purchase a manual wheelchair you know there are many types of manual wheelchairs available, so it’s essential to choose the one that’s right for you. If you’re looking for a manual wheelchair, here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Manual wheelchairs are best for people with good upper body strength and who can propel themselves.
  • Those who don’t want to rely on battery power.
  • Manual wheelchairs tend to be less expensive than power wheelchairs.

Who should use a power wheelchair?

If you’re considering a power wheelchair, here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Power wheelchairs are best suited for people with limited upper body strength who can’t propel themselves.
  • They who do not want to push themselves around manually.
  • Power wheelchairs are more expensive than manual wheelchairs.

So, which type of wheelchair is right for you? The best way to find out is to consult with a doctor or other medical professional. They can assess your individual needs and make a recommendation based on what will work best for you.

What is the cost associated with a wheelchair?

There is no one-size-fits-all answer to this question, as the cost of a wheelchair will vary depending on the type of wheelchair, its features, and where you purchase it. 

When pricing out a wheelchair expect to see pricing from a few hundred dollars for a manual wheelchair to several thousand dollars for a powerchair.

If you have insurance, your policy may cover some or all of the cost of a wheelchair. First, however, it’s essential to check with your insurance company to see what coverage they provide.

Will Medicare cover the cost associated with a wheelchair?

Diagnosis for electric wheelchair

Medicare will help cover the cost of a wheelchair if it is considered medically necessary. To be considered medically necessary, your doctor must determine that a wheelchair is the only way for you to maintain your mobility and independence.

If it is, your doctor will likely prescribe you a manual wheelchair. A power wheelchair will only be covered if it is determined that a manual wheelchair is not appropriate for your medical needs.

To learn more about which diagnoses qualify for wheelchairs, contact your doctor or Medicare representative today. With the right help, you can maintain your mobility and independence for years to come.

Final Thoughts on Which Diagnoses Qualify for Wheelchairs

There are a variety of qualifying diagnoses that can qualify someone for a manual or power wheelchair.

The decision of which type of wheelchair to prescribe is based on many factors, including the severity of the diagnosis, the patient’s age and mobility, and insurance coverage.

In some cases, a doctor may prescribe a wheelchair without a diagnosis, such as when a patient is severely obese or has a debilitating injury.

Ultimately, it is up to the doctor to decide whether or not a wheelchair is necessary for a particular patient.

If you think you may need a wheelchair, be sure to talk to your doctor about your options. They will be able to assess your individual needs and determine whether or not a wheelchair is suitable for you.

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About ASmith

Adam Smith is the main researcher and contributor at Mobility Medical Supply. Adam has many years of research in public data, and software security. With Mobility issues within Adam's family, he decided to dedicate in-depth guides on mobility products to anyone looking to improve movement and gain independence.

2 thoughts on “Which Diagnoses Qualify for Wheelchairs: Manual or Power”

  1. I am looking to buy a morterized wheelchair. My doctor has already said he would write a prescription for one. But I am haveing a hard time understanding where I can buy one and medicare cover it. If I can order online that would be great. But in the state of Minnesota there are not any medical suppliers that are medicare qualified for wheelchairs.
    And do not know if I can go order on line. Please advise if you can help.

    Thank you

    Lynda Norstad

    • Hi Lynda,

      Thanks for reaching out. We suggest many of our users to 1800wheelchair for most types of wheelchairs, scooters, and electric wheelchairs. Before you do anything, though, I would suggest calling and speaking with your insurance company and letting them know your situation and that your doctor has written you a prescription. They can list other retailers as well that are also in the Medicare network.

      You can buy from 1800wheelchair.com as well. Before you do, please read this section from their website: https://www.1800wheelchair.com/medicare-insurance/

      Hope this helps

      Mobility Medical Supply

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